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Salty Sunday – Keep em Wet or Not?

POSTED ON March 10th  - POSTED IN Uncategorized

I was jokingly referred to as being a little “salty” in last weeks post. After the winter we have endured I can certainly embrace that salty moniker. Since we are still not on the rivers yet, let’s keep that trend alive and tackle the growing Keep Em Wet campaign.

Keep Em Wet states it “is about releasing fish in the best condition possible. It’s a motto for minimizing air exposure, eliminating contact with dry surfaces, and reducing handling. It’s a movement to empower anglers to take small, simple steps to responsibly enjoy and share fishing experiences.”

I think that it is an awesome idea much like the Kick Plastic campaign, using barbless hooks, and the Clean Drain Dry movement to stop the spread of Aquatic Invasive Species. The main problem isn’t with the movements themselves. It’s the zealots who hijack things to serve the growing trend of social shaming.

These folks take an idea like Keep Em Wet and use it to broadcast their sense of moral superiority every chance they get. They are the vegan/crossfit heros of the fishing world. You will find them in the comments section of your news feed. Under a grip n grin photo of a nice fish, “Great fish! Too bad you killed it to get that pic.#keepemwet”

There are no shortage of examples like that out there. The problem is, no one responds well to being called out, either in person or on social media. If your real goal is education about proper fish handling or better fish survival then send someone a considerate direct message. Blasting them in the public comments is just a self righteous circle jerk.

Of course, the elephant in the room is the actual Keep Em Wet movement. They have done an excellent job in their literature of conveying their points without seeming judgmental or condescending. Their logic is fairly bullet proof, the less you handle a fish and the less time it spends out of water the better its chance of survival.

But how far do we take that logic? If you never even hook a fish surely it would have a better chance of survival. In fact if you never even stressed a fish by fishing to it, the fish would have a better chance of survival. Is the No Hook movement next? A cadre of anglers casting flies with the hooks cut off. Where do we draw the line, and how far down the rabbit hole do we want to go?

Personally, I love to photograph trout. They are all different and most of them are exquisitely beautiful. I get to scratch that photo itch often with my client’s fish. When I’m fishing I’m perfectly happy to unhook almost all of them in the net and let them escape quickly. But if I catch 3 permit in a week down in Mexico you can be damn sure I am going to photograph each one of them.

That is exactly what it is like for most of our clients. They don’t get to see thousands of trout each season. They feel lucky to get to fish a handful of days and they are excited to document the process. To them it’s not just another 16″ cutthroat. It’s the most brightly colored fish they have ever caught. The classic grip n grin is a staple for guides across the west and I don’t apologize for it.

Those photos connect anglers to a world they only dabble in. They are memories of the past, motivation for the future, and they translate into money not only for the fishing industry but a multitude of conservation organizations. Some fish certainly die as a result of a photo session, but I also know for a fact that some fish photos serve as a good reminder to send that fat annual donation check. Does that even the scales? Who knows.

I do try to shepherd anglers away from taking a photo of every fish they catch. Instruction on how to prepare and set up the shot is always given so it takes a minimum amount of time. I also show them how to properly hold a fish or I will hold it for them if needed. To become proficient at anything you have to practice, and I would prefer that anglers practice with me than on their own. I try to steer clear of excess, but we don’t shy away from fish pictures in my boat.

Still, I want that fish to live as much or more than anyone else, and most anglers are quick to pick up on that. Over the years I have seen many anglers go from wanting a shot of every trout to only taking one or two fish pics over 4 days. Most of us tend to go through that evolution and I think the Keep Em Wet campaign is trying to accelerate that process through education and awareness. An idea worth considering for sure.

It’s important to remember that we devote an inordinate amount of time, money, and energy to pursue tiny brained fish with whippy rods tossing pieces of feather and fur lashed to hooks only to let them go once we have caught them. Whether you throw a picture in there or not, the entire thing doesn’t make a whole lot of sense. We sure do love it though, and in the end it’s up to you whether you Keep Em Wet or not. Just make sure to disable the comments!

Secrets of Summer Fishing

POSTED ON August 12th  - POSTED IN Fishing Reports

August is our slowest month of the fishing season in Missoula.  The risk of forest fires and fishing restrictions have caused anglers to shy away from what used to be one of our more popular times.  It is certainly understandable, but for the anglers willing to gamble on August there are some secrets of summer fishing that can make for an awesome trip to Montana.

August is your best chance to find unpressured trout.  There are stretches of the Bitterroot and Clark Fork that may not see a guide boat for days during August.  If you find yourself on one of those stretches where the trout have been rested it can provide some of the best hopper fishing of the season.  There are a ton of fishing options around Missoula and many days in August you will have an entire stretch of river to yourself.  

Early on, early off is the key to success.  Water temps are most favorable early, before the heat of the day sets in.  The trout know this and they feed most aggressively during this time period.  Take in a gorgeous Montana sunrise and stick some nice trout when it’s most comfortable for everyone.  Get back to town and cleaned up to make the most of all Missoula has to offer in the late afternoon and evening.

Skill is rewarded in August.  A well placed hopper in just the right spot next to a log jam or a solid reach cast on target to a rising trout is the way to find the biggest trout during summer.  Take advantage of your existing skills and be willing to learn some new ones.  Time spent learning new fly fishing skills will pay off for seasons to come.  

Take what the river gives you.  We all want to fish single dry flies to large trout.  Some days we are able to pull that off.  Other days the fish are pounding droppers or they want to chase a streamer.  Other times the trout fishing is off all together and we are able to have fun sessions chasing northern pike or smallmouth bass.  Stay flexible in the summer to have the best fishing that you can.  In the past week our biggest trout came on a streamer and another angler landed a solid pike for the biggest fish of her career.  They adapted to the conditions and had a great trip.

We are enjoying some solitude and good fishing this August.  Not much in the way of forest fires and no fishing restrictions yet. There are definitely some secrets of summer fishing and our anglers have been enjoying themselves on the river.






Summer Fishing Season in Missoula

POSTED ON July 5th  - POSTED IN Uncategorized

Summer fishing season has finally arrived in Missoula!  A big snow year combined with a cool and wet spring resulted in high water all through May and June.  There were some great moments, but we did not see consistent dry fly fishing like we always hope for in June.   That has changed.  All the Missoula area rivers are dropping and clearing, and the dry fly bite has gained momentum in the last few days.

Based on the current conditions this looks to be our best July and August in several years.  There have been many years where are temps are in the 80’s-90’s by mid-June and by the time we get to July we are meeting at dawn to take advantage of the cool weather and active trout.  Yesterday we saw a high of 63 and we have been able to meet at a leisurely 8 am for weeks.  

All of the Missoula rivers have plenty of water and the water temperatures are ideal for this time of year.  The next couple of weeks will produce a myriad of good hatches from golden stoneflies, pale-morning duns, green drakes, yellow sallies, and caddis.  During hot, low water years we run through our hatch cycles very quickly, but during high water years the hatches are much more sustained.  The last high water year produced a golden stone hatch that went through the third week in July and we could very well see that again this year.  

August is our sleeper month.  Anglers are a little hesitant about fishing in August because of the chance of fishing restrictions and forest fires.  As a result August has become the month with the least amount of river traffic during the entire season.  If you enjoy solitude then August is the month for you.  In a high water year we can have fantastic dry fly fishing in August.  Hoppers are the main game, but there are also good hatches of tricos, fall drakes, and spruce moths.

We will be in shorts and sandals for the next couple months enjoying the best that summer fishing season has to offer.  It promises to be some of our best dry fly fishing this year and the crowds will thin by mid-July.  If you have a trip planned your in luck, and if you are thinking of coming out we still have some availability left.






Hero or Zero Season

POSTED ON June 11th  - POSTED IN Fishing Reports

Hero or zero season has finally arrived in western Montana.  At least that’s how I like to think about this time period when the rivers are finally dropping, but there are still a lot of questions about the fishing.  In the next 10 days or so I am fairly certain that I will see some of the very best fishing of the season, but there will be heartache too.  The only question is how much?

As a guide I try to gather as much information as possible to make my fishing decisions.  Angler ability, reports from fellow guides, streamflows, weather, hatches, etc. all factor in to the decision of where to go each day.  That decision is more important now than at any other time period during the season.  

Some years I will have stretches where I make the right call 4 or 5 days in a row.  The fishing is incredible, the clients think you walk on water, and if you’re not careful you’ll start to believe it a little bit too.  Then there are stretches when you miss the call 4 or 5 days straight.  The fishing is tough to downright miserable, your clients wonder if you really have a guide license, and you fill out applications for Subway at night.

The misses always hurt, but they are a little easier to take when you gamble on something that no one else is fishing.  Those are home run days where you either hit it out of the park or strike out swinging.  The misses that start to mess with your head are when you are off by only a few river miles, either just above or below the action.  Hearing a fishing report from a buddy who killed them 5 miles downstream while you were getting it shoved is absolutely brutal.  It happens to everyone, but that doesn’t make it any easier.

The problem with Missoula, and it’s a good problem, is that there is so much water.  If we just had one river then we’d fish it everyday, take the good with the bad and move one.  Not here, we have 350 miles and 4 different watersheds in play over the next 2 weeks.  Every day, some guide on some stretch is going to have off the charts fishing.  Other guides are going to go home with their tails between their legs.  It’s not just chance or dumb luck, there is a method to the madness but there are no guarantees either.  

I guess that is what makes June so unique.  The chance at having the best fishing of the year, even your life, on any give day mixed with the very real possibility of coming up short.  It’s not the best thing for a guide’s mental health or liver but it certainly keeps things interesting.  






Spring Fishing Season

POSTED ON March 8th  - POSTED IN Fishing Reports, Uncategorized

The spring fishing season has finally arrived in Missoula!  Old Man Winter has relaxed his grip just enough to make fishing enjoyable again.  I am certain that we haven’t seen the end of winter yet, but we have strung together enough 40+ degree days to get things moving in the right direction.

The extra daylight and increasing water temperatures have spurred the mass migration of Skwala nymphs into the shallows.  The Bitterroot river is the focus of this early spring fishing season, but Rock Creek and the Clark Fork are coming to life as well.

Right now it is almost strictly a nymphing game on all of our rivers.  Two nymphs under an indicator in the slower, moderate depth water is the best tactic to find fish.  You may find the sporadic risers to midges on the Bitterroot or Clark Fork in the afternoons.  A small single dry can fool those picky eaters, but you are not going to cruise down the river with a big Skwala and crush them, at least not yet.

Another small storm is on tap for early in the weekend, but the forecast for next week is the kind that cabin fever sufferers dream about.  Temperatures in the 40’s and even low 50’s are on tap with partly cloudy skies.  Conditions can change quickly in the spring, and my guess is that next week will see the first solid dry fly fishing of the season with Skwalas.

It has been a long, cold winter in Missoula but there is finally light at the end of the tunnel.  The next two months will produce some of the best dry fly fishing of the season.  The boats have been cleaned, fly boxes organized, and we will be on the river daily starting next week.  The spring fishing season has begun!






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